Commonly Confused Words Part 1: Login, Log In, Into, In To

Commonly Confused Words Part 1: Login, Log In, Into, In To

Do you ever find yourself wondering if you should log into a site, login to a site, or log in to a site? Maybe you hadn’t, but after reading the previous sentence you’re left confused. Don’t worry. In the next two blog posts we’ll explore login vs. log in and into vs. in to. Soon, you’ll be able to log in to, login to, or log into any site like a grammar pro!

Login vs. Log in: A Bit of History

First, a bit of history: did you know that login, spelled as one word instead of two, has only been in use since the late 1970s? This makes sense, as the usage of login parallels the growth of personal computing technologies.

Google NGram graph of appearances of login and log in in print from 1900 to 2000: 

 

Noun, Verb, or Adjective?

Login should be used as either a noun or an adjective, while log in is used as a verb.

Login as a noun refers to the information you need to enter a computer, database, or system.

Examples:  

Your login is important for protecting your computer.

Your login includes your username and password.

As an adjective, login describes another noun. For example, in the following example, login describes information:

Do you remember your login information?

As a verb, login is spelled as two words. Note that in the previous sentence, login functions as a noun and so is only one word.

Log in is a phrasal verb (a verb + another element – in the case of log in, the verb is log and the other element is the preposition in).  In the following sentences you’ll see it functioning as a verb (describing an action), and so written: log in.

Please log in and connect to the Internet.

Log in using your old password and then create a new one.

That’s all for today!

In our next blog post, we’ll look at into vs. in to. If you can’t wait until then to further explore the mysteries of the English language, don’t worry! Sign up for one of our language learning programs or come to our ESL conversation sessions every Thursday evening (1407 Alexander St, level 2). Call us at 514-989-1669 ext 225 to reserve your spot!